IDIOM – running on fumes

RUNNING ON FUMES

(idiom) – having very low energy but continuing to go, do, or work**

Example #1:
Friend #1:  Are you still shopping?  It’s 9:00 at night and you started shopping at 6:00 this morning!
Friend #2:  I know.  I’m running on fumes now so I will probably stop very soon.

Example #2:
Mother:  Have you been studying all night long?  You must be very tired.  How can you keep your eyes open?
Son:  I don’t know.  I must be running on fumes because I am so tired but I must stay awake so I can take my English test.

Post your own examples of RUNNING ON FUMES in the comments section below.

You don’t have to worry about running on fumes while travelling with Language on Vacation.  We study and travel a lot, but we always get a good night’s sleep.

running on fumes

**the origin of “running on fumes” comes from cars. Cars need gasoline to work, but sometimes when there isn’t any liquid gasoline remaining, cars will continue to run for an extra mile on the gaseous fumes left in the fuel tank.

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TRAVEL – “Staycation”

“STAYCATION”

2016-04-17 Staycation

A friend of mine recently took a “staycation.” “Staycations” are very similar to vacations. They sound similar and they both allow you take time off from your daily routines.

On vacations, you don’t have to go to work and you go somewhere away from home to enjoy your time off.
On “staycations,” you don’t have to go to work, but you stay home and enjoy your time off.

My friend stayed home for her staycation. She slept in until 9am every day. One day, she stayed in her pajamas all day long. Another day, she went to the local park to enjoy the sunshine. She spent another day tending her garden, and another day catching up on her housework. She said it was a very relaxing break.

I like vacations. I like to go somewhere new. Sometimes, I like to go to an old and favorite destination. I like to see new things and enjoy new experiences.

Do you prefer “Staycations” or Vacations?

Write your answers in the comments section below.

Come enjoy your time off with Language on Vacation! Book your favorite tour and go someplace new! See new things and enjoy new experiences!!!

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VOCABULARY – comfortable

COMFORTABLE

(adjective) – something that makes you feel good or natural

Example #1:
Joe: Are you going to wear a suit on the plane?
Mary: No, I want to be comfortable. I am going to wear yoga pants.

Example #2:
Mother: How are your new shoes?
Son: Not good. They’re not comfortable. They’re too tight.

Post your own examples in the comments section below.

Bring your comfortable shoes when you travel with Language on Vacation!

comfortable

**comfortable has many meanings, this is just one meaning

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TRAVEL – Comfortable on a plane

COMFORTABLE
It is important to be comfortable when on an airplane. Sometimes you are on a plane for a long time and you need to remain comfortable throughout the flight.

What should you wear on a flight?

I have flown over oceans and continents. The longest time I have ever spent in an airplane was for 14 hours from Los Angeles, USA to Sydney, Australia. I wore yoga pants, a long t-shirt, and clogs.* I looked very casual but was comfortable and presentable.

Recently, I have often been travelling from Seattle, USA to Tokyo, Japan. I don’t wear yoga pants anymore but I wear pajama jeans instead. I love my pajama jeans. They look like regular jeans, but they aren’t tight around my waist and they stretch. They are very comfortable and practical for traveling.

What do you wear when you travel?

Write your answers in the comments section below.

*clogs = a shoe that often has a thick sole

Comfortable

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VOCABULARY – lug

LUG

(verb) – to carry something, usually something heavy that requires effort

Example:
Tourist:  I wish I hadn’t packed so many things in my suitcase.  It’s difficult to lug around the train station!

Post your own examples in the comments section below.

Lug your own suitcase with Language on Vacation!  Book a tour TODAY!

lug

 

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IDIOM – hit the road

HIT THE ROAD

(Idiom, verb) – to begin a journey, usually in a car. To depart or leave.

Example:
Teacher: Okay, we’ve finished English classes so let’s hit the road and drive to Las Vegas!

Example:
Tourist: It’s a long drive from San Francisco to Los Angeles so let’s hit the road so we can arrive in LA before sunset!

Hit the road with Language on Vacation and book a tour TODAY!

hit the road

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IDIOM – get the ball rolling

GET THE BALL ROLLING

(Idiom, slang) – to start a new process, to start an activity, or a series of events

Example:
Student A: We should travel to America!
Student B: We have been talking about going to America for 5 years, but we never do anything about it.
Student A: Well let’s get the ball rolling! You book the hotels and I’ll book the airfare and we’ll go to the American consulate to get our travel visas together!

Try to create your own examples in the comments section below!

get the ball rolling

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